How To: String a Lacrosse Head in 26 Easy Steps

 

String a Lacrosse Head with Mesh

Materials

Lacrosse head

Mesh ( Stretch out thoroughly/ wash in hair conditioner if need be)

(2) 33″ top string (More or less)

(2)  25″  cross lace for sidewall

11″ bottom string

(2) Shooting strings

 

For another stringing article with good fundamental knowledge of  the string, consider How to String a Lacrosse Stick presented by Medicine Man Lacrosse.

 

 

 

1.) Take the mesh and fold the top over 2-3 rows. For the purpose of this guide, you should have 10 holes across the top.

 

Figure 1 Lacrosse Stringing Head

Figure 1

2) The first step in stringing a lacrosse stick is to attach the mesh to the scoop of the head. To start, tie a figure 8 knot on one end of the lace and pull the other end thorough the first sidewall hole as shown in Figure 2 & 2a.

Figure 2, the lace should be pulled through the folded mesh so the string comes from underneath the mesh.

 

Figure 2 Lacrosse Stringing Head

Figure 2

Figure 2a Lacrosse Stringing Head

Figure2a

3) Figure 3, once through the first mesh hole bring the lace back over the sidewall rail illustrated by the white arrow and insert in the 2nd sidewall hole with the blue arrow shown in Figure 3a. One through the second sidewall hole, bring the lace through the 1st mesh diamond for a second time from underneath.

Figure 3 Lacrosse Stringing Head

Figure 3

Figure 3a Lacrosse Stringing Head

Figure 3a

4.)  Figure 4 shows that the first mesh diamond is anchored to the side of the lacrosse head with the lace now through the mesh hole in position to now attach the rest of the mesh to the scoop.

Figure 4 Lacrosse Stringing Head

Figure 4

5) Now its time to attach the mesh to the scoop holes. Take the position of the lace shown in Figure 4 and push it through the 2nd mesh hole, bringing the lace underneath the scoop and pulling it though the 1st large scoop hole. Figure 5 and 5a.

 

Figure 5 Lacrosse Stringing Head

Figure 5

Figure 5a

6) Pull the lace from  the scoop hole (Pink) and bring it under the previous segment of lace (Red) so that it resembles Figure 6, making sure that the string is as tight as possible.

Figure 6

Figure 6a

7.) Continue to now bring the lace over the backside of the mesh and push it through the 4th mesh hole indicated in a white number 4. Bring the lace under the scoop and pull it through the 2nd scoop hole indicated by the orange number 2.

 

Pull the lace from  the scoop hole  and bring it under the previous segment of lace  so that it resembles Figure 6, making sure that the string is as tight as possible.

 

Figure 7

8.) Continue  to bring the mesh through the 7th mesh hole underneath through the 3rd large scoop hole and then under the previous segment of lace. Pull tight.

Figure 8

9.) Continue to bring the mesh through the 9th mesh hole underneath through the 4th large scoop hole and under the previous segment of lace. Pull tight.

Figure 9

10) Push the lace (Neon Green) through the last mesh hole and through the  1st sidewall hole.. Once through tie a knot at the end. The first part of the topstring is complete. Be sure that all the lace segments are tight for a consistent pocket.

 

Now if you wish you may add a second string across the top for an added measure of durability.

However if you choose not too, you must  anchor the last mesh hole to the sidewall.

 

Making a knot at the end of the second lace, push the lace through the 2nd sidewall hole and up though the 1st mesh hole. As illustrated by the white arrow, bring the lace over the sidewall and through the 2nd sidewall wall and up through the first mesh hole again.

 

Figure 10

Figure 10a

11) Now that the second string has anchored the mesh to the sidewall hole, use the extra lace as an added reinforcement by doing steps 4-10 from the left.

 

Push the lace (Orange) though the 2nd mesh hole and under through the 1st scoop hole. Then bring the lace (Purple) under the previous segment of lace.

 

Figure 11

Figure 11a

12) Continue by pushing the lace (Yellow) though the 5th mesh hole and under through the 2nd  scoop hole. Then bring the lace (Blue) under the lace colored in yellow.

Figure 12

Figure 12a

13) Continue following the illustrations.

 

Figure 13

 

14) Continue to follow the illustration.

Figure 14

 

15) Finally pull the lace through the 10th mesh hole and  knot it through the sidewall hole.

 

 

Figure 15

Sidewall


16) The next step is to string the sidewall . The sidewall is the most important part in forming the pocket. There are different ways to string the sidewall and many variations  with the sidewall holes and corresponding mesh holes you choose to use. Shown here are examples of locking the mesh to the sidewall holes and doubling up.

 

These illustrations will show you this techniques that will enable the stringer to customize the pocket formation to their preference. Generally pocket s are formed by the shape of the head, but depending  on the techniques , the number of sidewall holes, their location and the attachment of the corresponding mesh diamonds will affect the size and shape of the pocket.

 

* Recommendation: String both the left and right sidewalls at the same time to prevent uneven stringing and mistakes.

 

 

Figure 16

17)  Knot the sidewall string at one end and insert the other end into the sidewall hole and under through the mesh. Then bring the lace over the sidewall and through the same sidewall hole and under though the mesh again.

 

Figure 17

Figure 17a

18) Notice Figure 18 as the lace comes out of the anchored mesh hole  (Yellow) and through  the 2nd mesh hole (Red). As illustrated in Figure 2a the lace (Green) then enters the inner sidewall hole, over the sidewall rail and then under the previous segment of lace. This technique can be described as locking the mesh to the rail.

 

Figure 18

Figure 18a

19) Again, this technique applies  to the next rail and mesh hole.

Figure 19

20) A view from the left, Figure 5 illustrates a skipped sidewall hole with the lace underlying the previous segment of lace. Notice that the lace goes though the mesh diamond and then though the inner sidewall hole.

The reason why I chose to skip a hole is because I felt that that the mesh diamond did not line up.  If I did not skip a hole here, I would end up using s  a diamond lower than plane of the sidewall here, thus bunching up the mesh and forming a deeper pocket higher in head, which I prefer not to have at this moment. It’s a matter of preference.

Figure 20

21) A close up example of interlocking.

Figure 21

22) Figure 6 illustrates  the technique of doubling up  the mesh. Notice how the lace goes through 2 mesh holes before entering the inner sidewall hole.. Doubling up allows a deeper, larger pocket.

Figure 22

23) Finally, completing the sidewall is the lace going through 2 sidewall holes  before ending in the  bottom sidewall hole with a  knot.

 

Figure 23

 

Bottom String


24) Now to tie off the mesh, Put a bottom string through the first hole on the bottom of the head. Then put up through the 2nd mesh hole and weave through the rest of the holes until finally reaching the 9th mesh hole where you push it down  through the bottom hole.

 

This is one way to tie off the mesh, but you can experiment with what ever works for you.

 

 

Figure 24

 

 

Figure 24a

Shooting Strings

 

25) The final part is  to string the shooters. Here are illustrations of 2 weaved straight shooters.

 

Begin by pushing the shooting string  either though an empty sidewall hole or around the sidewall string like the Figure 25.

 

 

Figure 25

 

26) Continue by weaving the shooting string  straight across through each diamond hole . Be sure that you have a consistent weaving method and that each lace has an even tension.

 

 

Figure 26

 

Figure 26a

Figure 26b

 

27) Finish by wrapping the shooters around the crosslace or through a sidewall hole, and tie off.

 

Figure 27

Congratulations, you  just finished stringing your first lacrosse stick. If you have any questions or would like to add constructive criticism, leave a comment.

Figure 28

 

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